Scholarly Collaboration, Day 2

This morning’s first panel was on campus strategic planning initiatives.

Joel Cooper, Egohsa Awaah, Andrea Nixon, “Study of Visual Materials Use at Carleton College”

— collaborative ethic at Carleton, but sense of needing to move beyond collaboration to partnership; developing partnership between ITS and library; interest in broadening discussions about academic support (lots of conversations, including monthly forum)
— two curricular initiatives that these conversations worked with: visual culture; quantitative reasoning
— developing “Arts Union and Digital Asset Resource Center,” connected to lots of fields (art history, film & media studies, etc)
— current efforts: development of Mellon planning grant for thinking about support of visuality; created position, Director of Curricular and Research Support; goal is developing a coordinated, integrated support model
— study of student and faculty use of visual resources — flip chart exercise asking what users like about working in particular spaces and what they’d prefer; interviews asking where students study and how, how students and faculty members work on assignments, etc

Paul Burnam, “Ohio Wesleyan’s Strategic Planning for Scholarly Communications”

— developing a plan for scholarly communications in a digital age
— process for changing campus climate w/r/t scholarly communication: raising awareness of underlying problems such as subscription costs, new publishing options, etc; creating an understanding of the interconnectedness of publishing and credentialing issues; activism in changing tenure/promotion systems, making digital platforms more available, creating commitment of resources; creating sense of ownership among faculty, administrators, etc.; creating a united effort among faculty, administrators, librarians
— implementation of process: begin with environmental scan of institution and library
— promoting scholarly communication within the faculty — encouraging senior faculty to participate in electronic forums; targeting segment of faculty leaders to argue for the recognition of publication in OA journals; other means of promoting OA journals within faculty
— workshops for librarians, staff, faculty; creation of campus scholarly communications committee; launch online open access journal on campus

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