in networks

Blegging: Preservation

I’m deep in the thick of the chapter I’m writing on issues of preservation for digital scholarship, and am feeling fairly acutely the extent to which these issues have not been on my radar before now, so I need to ask for your help, particularly the digital librarians among you.

While there are a number of extremely important reports that have been published around these issues of late (see, for instance, the Blue Ribbon Task Force interim report, “Sustaining the Digital Investment,” the MITH white paper “Approaches to Managing and Collecting Born-Digital Literary Materials for Scholarly Use”, and the ARL report, “Safeguarding Collections at the Dawn of the 21st Century”, among others), I’m focusing the chapter around a few particular projects of which I could really use a deeper sense.

What I’m looking for is critical accounts of the histories of the histories of projects such as TEI, COinS, DOI, and LOCKSS, accounts that both convey the development and administration of the programs as well as any lingering issues with which the projects need to contend. I’ve found some basic stuff about each project, but if there are particularly good resources out there, I’d love to hear about them!

[Ed: Just critical accounts of the histories of the projects, not critical accounts of the histories of the histories. Not enough coffee yet…]

Write a Comment

Comment

  1. You may know of this publication already, but . . . there are a couple of essays in this volume, Strategies for Sustaining Digital Libraries, which you may find helpful: “Sustainability, Publishing, and Digital Libraries” (Mike Furlough) and “Principles and Activities of Digital Curation for Developing Successful and Sustainable Repositories” (Leslie Johnston). The book is available for download (PDF) here: http://www.asiaing.com/strategies-for-sustaining-digital-libraries.html . The latter essay may sound less relevant, but as I recall, Johnston does address the curation of digital scholarship. And since the forward is written by Martin Halbert and Katherine Skinner, who have experience with LOCKSS, there may well be some historical accounting in this volume, too. Good luck! I’m eager to read your book when it comes out!

  2. Hi, Patricia. For whatever reason, your first comment didn’t appear until after I’d already left mine — but thanks so much for pointing me to the volume, which I’m sure will be a big help!